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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What to Do In A Dental Emergency?
  2. Pregnancy – Dental Health Begins in the Womb
  3. Healthy Teeth and Gums Start with the Control of Plaque
  4. Flossing: What could be simpler?
  5. Dentin Hypersensitivity 
  6. What’s with Canker Sores?
  7. Inlays and Onlays: Invisible Mending for your Teeth

1. What to Do In A Dental Emergency?

You’ve injured your mouth, what are you going to do? If your tooth is cracked or loose, very gently hold it together and place it back until you reach us. With a missing tooth, time is critical; you only have about 15 to 30 minutes before it’s considered unsalvageable. If the tooth is dirty, replanting it is not possible. Clean it and put it in a glass of milk. Do not let the tooth dry out.

 

2. Pregnancy – Dental Health Begins in the Womb

According to the old saying, when you’re pregnant you’re eating for two. And what you eat affects the health of your baby including his or her teeth.

During this period, your intake of protein, calcium and phosphorus aids in fetal development, as do your levels of vitamins A, C and D.

You should also be concerned about your dental health during pregnancy. First of all, make sure you tell the dentist that you’re pregnant (so your baby is not put at risk by procedure such as x-rays). Also, be aware that changes in your hormone levels may cause your gums to become more susceptible to gum disease. Keep an eye on them, and call the dentist if problems persist.

 

3. Healthy Teeth and Gums Start with the Control of Plaque

The key to keeping teeth healthy for a lifetime is to control plaque. Plaque is a clear, sticky film of live bacteria that forms constantly in the mouth and acts on sugar to produce toxic acids that weaken the teeth and gums.

There are many aspects to keeping plaque at bay. One is home care, proper daily brushing and flossing. Another is sensible nutrition, in particular, limiting sugar intake.

A professional cleaning at our office is time well spent in preventing plaque build-up, and gum disease. We are able to get into places your toothbrush can’t reach, remove any mild stains and discolouration, review home care, and discuss ways to improve your oral health.

We invite you to visit our practice and see for yourself how we can help you and your family maintain a healthy smile for life.

 

4. Flossing: What could be simpler?

Flossing is an amazing, simple dental cleaning technique that helps reduce plaque build-up that can lead to tooth decay and gum disease.

The benefits of a few minutes of flossing are evident every time you smile.
 

5. Dentin Hypersensitivity

Many people who suffer from sensitive teeth find it worsens in cooler weather. This is called dentin hypersensitivity. It occurs when the layer of tissue beneath tooth enamel called dentin is stimulated by extreme cold (or hot) temperatures, causing pain.

There are two common causes of dentin hypersensitivity. First of all, what you might not know is that your teeth expand and contract with temperature changes. As this happens over a period of time, your enamel can become cracked, exposing your dentin. The second perpetrator is worn down enamel, (which can happen for a number of reasons) which exposes your root surface and dentin.
Don’t worry, the hypersensitivity is a common occurrence and can sometimes be eased simply with over-the-counter desensitizing toothpaste. If the problem is a little more extensive, a dentist can take care of your sensitivity with a number of different treatments.

If you find your teeth really bother you when you’re out in cold weather, try breathing through your nose. If you find they become repeatedly irritated with cold and hot temperatures, it’s best to make a dental appointment.

 

6. What’s with Canker Sores?

That painful stab in your mouth doesn’t feel like a toothache, but it is hurts like crazy. It could be a canker sore. But is it, what causes it and, more importantly, how can you prevent it from happening again?

Canker sores are generally small and can be identified by a red spot with a white head on it. You can find them on the roof of your mouth, the inside of your lips and cheeks, on or under your tongue. The exact cause of canker sores is not known, but there are many things that can trigger them. Little cuts and burns, stress and high-acid foods are known culprits; some women also get them as part of menstruation.

As far as treatments, there are many over-the-counter medications that can help ease the discomfort. If the problem persists longer than a week, the sores become larger or you have difficulty eating, make an appointment and we’ll be happy to advise you on alternative treatments.

 

7. Inlays and Onlays: Invisible Mending for your Teeth

Silver amalgam fillings used to be one of the only answers when it came to repairing or rebuilding decayed or damaged teeth, but not anymore. Today, with porcelain and composite resin inlays and onlays, we can make a damaged tooth look brand new – and stronger, too.

Creating an inlay (used in place of a filling) or onlay (sometimes called a partial crown) is a little more involved than a conventional filling, but there is typically no added discomfort and the results can be amazing.

The process involves two steps:

In the first one, we prepare your tooth by removing the decayed area or reshaping the broken tooth structure. Then we take an impression to create a porcelain or composite inlay or onlay that fits your tooth.

In the second step, we check the fit, contouring and colour of the inlay or onlay. The result not only looks like a natural, undamaged tooth but also makes the tooth stronger.

If you’re self-conscious about your damaged teeth – or your large fillings – ask us about the current onlay and inlay materials and procedures.